TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Naushena — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

For me creativity is a self expression of one’s inner feelings and emotions that are not or cannot always verbally expressed. Creativity encompasses writing, art, dance, music, painting etc. Hence, I use writing as a medium and words as my tool to express myself.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

It all started when I was a sophomore and our Literature Teacher had given us few words to compose either a poem or a paragraph. As l always wanted to do things differently, I wrote a poem and felt very proud of myself. Having discovered my talent, there was no stopping me. My creative muse is none other than my eyes! Yes, they enable me to see people and things and I feel empathy to compose on any subject.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

The one which often recurs in my mind is when I was having tea sitting on my terrace. I saw a ragamuffin across the road, sweeping a restaurant’s ground. I was so moved by his tattered clothes and appearance that I wrote a poem at night upon him by the title,The Ragamuffin. The next day I looked for him but never saw him again. He still lives in my poem.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I think creativity comes naturally you cannot decide beforehand that today you would write a poem or tomorrow you would paint.I sometimes paint or draw a sketch when I am happy or vice versa.Many times I don’t create anything for days.So there is no set routine, it depends on the arrival.

I don’t believe in superstitions but some people do and associate their work to them which I think is wrong.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

You know, a person always takes time out for anything he loves be it singing,sports, excursions or writing. We make an excuse of the lack of time for something we’re not interested in. Similarly, because I love to write, whenever I have an idea or a line for a topic, I instantly jot it down in my journal or my cellphone even if I am busy so that I do not forget. Once I get time, I expand it.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

The very first tip is believing in themselves. When you create something feel happy about it and be confident to share it with the world. If you don’t show your work, people cannot read or critique it. Don’t let it lie wasted in your cabinet. Remember, criticism is also a ladder to success. Moreover, do not procrastinate. If you have a thought, work on it and make it happen. One cannot be creative if one doesn’t create and for that you need sensitivity that impels you to create anything.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

Creativity is a vast and unlimited work and there are superb people out there. I just want to be mentioned as one of the creatives in few fields because I am still learning everyday. I am just an amateur sketcher and a painter. As far as poetry is concerned, I think I have made my name and I am happily contented.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Naushena

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Naushena — Poetry Contributor
Naushena’s passion to express her feelings and emotions through poetry grew with her. Her work covers a wide range of topics from the themes of society in general to human experiences. She has been published in Five Poetry vol 10, The Black Lion Journal, Antarctica Journal, Peeking Cat Poetry Magazine, Scarlet Leaf Review 8- West Press, Mad Swirl, Boston Literary Magazine, Mamalode, Mothers Always Write, EXPOUND , Digging Through the Fat and Lummox Journal.

You Can Find More Of Naushena’s Work Here

8-West Press / Antartica Journal

Read Naushena’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Life” — p. 21
“I Finally Killed…” — p. 108

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Stephen Mead — Art/Combinación Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Creativity to me is an innate urge to try to make sense of life or, failing that, to at least deal with and even, depending on the theme, celebrate or persevere.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I started at a pretty early age, pre-teen, and there were many influences throughout the arts beyond my early 20s: Joni Mitchell, Sylvia Plath, Chagall, probably even the choreography of Gene Kelly musicals or West Side Story…but now the creative spark, rooted in the osmosis in all of those things, is more an interior openness to a certain spark/gut thump which stirs the impulse.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

The most memorable experience influence-wise is when I saw Monet’s Water Lilies and then Van Gogh’s Starry Night at a museum. As some have a spiritual pilgrimage at a Wailing Wall, I felt something tremendously emotional welling up to the point of quietly overflowing. (I mean I did not make a scene in public!) Personally, a recurrence I have in the midst of working on a piece (even a poem) is a sense that is a mixture of de ja vu and also becoming a conduit for some source much greater than me and my little life.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I used to require music when doing art, silence while writing… but procrastination up until the point where I feel I will burst, doing a lot of the groundwork in my head, is probably the biggest, most consistent part of my creativity.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

I am not a particularly social animal and find much about our species to be disturbing with what I glean from social media and the news only reinforcing that, so after the day job, my creative time is evenings and then, with luck, larger blocks of time on weekends.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

I think is it OK to not rush into wanting to be noticed/published, even sharing with others right away both… when beginning the creative journey and also while being creative for years. I find that privacy is nourishing and for me, early on, rejection, negative feedback, was detrimental both to the art and the inner gut thump needed to attempt it. Let the art take you on the journey and what branches out to other paths along the way, then, as you get older, you will see rejection is subjective not an insurmountable penalty handed down by the Celestial Godhead.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

With my creativity I hope that the finished piece is satisfied with knowing that I brought the best of what I have within to it. Since I have a day job I don’t have to worry about being creative as a profession to make money so, in five years, given the political situation of both the United States and the globe, I hope the Earth itself is still in good enough shape for us all to find and engage in creativity in whatever form it may take.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Stephen

A resident of NY, Stephen Mead is a Outsider published artist, writer, maker of short-collage films and sound-collage downloads. In 2014 he began a webpage to gather links of his poetry being published in such zines as Great Works, Unlikely Stories, Quill & Parchment, etc., in one place: Poetry on the Line, Stephen Mead.

For links to his other media and even merchandise if you are interested please feel free to Google Stephen Mead Art.

View Stephen’s Art/Combinación In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Montage Series (8 Images)” — p. 75

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: P.C. Scheponik — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Creativity is making the choice to follow a path of perceptive vigilance and to translate the emotions and experiences one has into artful expressions that will enhance a more passionate and compassionate embrace of life in this world.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I began my poetic life at nine years old with my first poem, which was about Easter.
At thirteen, I had my first published poem, “Little John John’s Prayer.” It was a poem honoring the memory of John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s assassination and was published in the local paper, The Times Herald in Norristown.
For as long as I can recall, I have always been in love with words—their sounds, their meanings, their ability to evoke and enchant. My first muse was Dr. Seuss. He taught me to love the playfulness of rhyme and impossible situations. My second muse was Shelley who taught me the truth about thorns and bleeding. My third, and probably most powerful muse was/is Sharon Olds who taught me to love the matter of this world and my place in it.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

I had two major memorable creative experiences:
At forty-two, I suffered a CVA (stroke) from a blood clot in my brain. I was blessed with the relic of St. Padre Pio, famed stigmatist, and was immediately cured. The stroke rewired my brain and the way I wrote poetry. I wrote my first published collection, Psalms to Padre Pio, because of these experiences.
My second experience was hearing Robert Haas at a reading state, “Poets were the keepers of memory.” This idea captivated me and led to my researching and writing of my second published collection, And the Sun Still Dared to Shine, a collection of poems remembering the victims of the Holocaust.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I write every day—unless I am submitting, and my writing time is engaged in that way.
I usually write in the early morning, often at The Beanery, a local coffee haunt in Ocean City, MD, where I live with my wife, Shirley, and our shizon, Bella. I always write long hand in journals that have nice pictures on the covers. The pictures are usually nature scenes or symbols that call to me in some way. I carry my journal in a small grey bag slung over my shoulder. I only use Precise V5 black ink fine point pens because I like the way the ink flows onto the lines of the page.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

My poetry makes time for me. When the poems want to be written—which they always do—I have no other choice in the matter. They will hammer away inside of me until I set them loose on the line. Often the poem begins with a phrase or a line in my head. I’ll repeat it, open the journal, begin writing, and follow the ideas as fast as they come—trying to keep up, trying to catch them. That is why I always write initially in long hand in journals and type the poems up later. Too much thinking while writing in the initial version can murder the poem. Revision comes only after the poem is initially on the page.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Live attentively.
Read other poets—reread those you love, again and again.
Write everyday—even if only for 15-30 minutes.
Don’t think every poem you write must be published.
Daily writing is like exercise. It makes you a better and a stronger wordsmith.
Write for yourself—be your own audience first, and you will be true, and you will be beautiful.
Don’t be afraid to revise and revise the revision—even years later.
Believe in your work.
Research the journals you want to submit to. Make sure that your poems’ themes and styles are a good fit. Then Submit! Submit! Submit!
Send only your most polished works—grammar, spelling, proper formatting, and cover letter all a must!
Don’t be hurt by rejections—they are as necessary as the air poets breathe.
If an editor personalizes a rejection—always send a thank you. They are very busy and do NOT owe you that personalization. Obviously, they have taken the time to let you know they valued your voice—even if it wasn’t a fit for that issue.
Always be gracious to editors for their time and expertise.
Always send a thank you to editors who choose to publish your work. If they had not made that decision, your voice would not be shared.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

I hope to honor, to give praise to this world.
I hope to inspire others to honor to give praise to this world.
If my whole creative life, if my entire poetic canon could be the song of one indigo bunting on a spring day, I will not have lived, not have written in vain.
Five years from now I hope to still be writing every morning at The Beanery. I hope to still be living with my wife, Shirley, and our shizon, Bella, in Ocean City, MD. I’d like to publish additional collections of poetry. I wouldn’t mind doing some lectures or readings.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About P.C. Scheponik

I have published four collections of poems: Psalms to Padre Pio (National Centre for Padre Pio, INC), A Storm by Any Other Name, Songs the Sea has Sung in Me (PS Books, a division of Philadelphia Stories), and And the Sun Still Dared to Shine (Mazo Publishers). My work has also appeared in a number of smaller journals.

Most recently I have been published in All the Sins Literary Journal and Adelaide Literary Magazine (Number 7 Volume II June 2017). As well, I was a finalist and winner in Adelaide Literary Magazine Awards 2017 and will be published in the Adelaide Literary Magazine Awards Anthology for 2017.

Read P.C. Scheponik’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“In Comparison” — p. 20
“From A Distance” — p. 27

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Hannah Rodabaugh — Poetry & CNF Contributor, Pushcart Nominee

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

I don’t know if it’s neurological or comes from some collective unconscious “agony of the spirit” or both. Mostly I think it’s communicating with something larger than yourself in whatever form it may take and seeing what you come up with.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

In college, I was queued up to be a microbiologist. I wanted to work at the CDC, and then I sort of fell into poetry, and went over that way. I tend to be inspired by nature or science, but I find myself returning to the works of Blake and contemporary women poets like Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, Chelsey Minnis, and Alice Notley.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

My most recent memorable experience was last summer when I was an artist-in-resistance for Craters of the Moon National Monument (a dormant volcanic fissure surrounded by a lava flow the size of Rhode Island). I wrote poems about claustrophobia and eyeless cave beetles in lava tube caves, and wrote odes to the park’s plants and animals while standing over a dormant volcanic crater.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I like having space and silence in that I seek out vast desolate landscapes I can be quiet in. Those help calm my mind so that I can hear myself think enough to have something to say. I also pace a lot when I work.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

In many ways, it’s a loaded question, because very few poets make a living at poetry, so everybody I know has a full-time job – usually teaching, editing, or working at a non-profit. I guess I’m no different. I’ve worked as an adjunct, a copywriter, gotten grants, and taught writing to kids to support my habit.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

What has been helpful for me is reading widely in a number of subjects, and finding a group of poets who give me feedback on my work.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

That’s hard to say. Once we put work out into the world, it belongs to everyone that reads it. We can say that we want a certain thing to come across, and then someone interprets it to mean something else. Our intentions seldom remain fixed to the work.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Hannah

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Hannah Rodabaugh — Poetry & CNF Contributor, Pushcart Nominee
I have an MA from Miami University and an MFA from Naropa University. My work has been published or is forthcoming in Berkeley Poetry Review, ROAR Magazine, Horse Less Review, Written River, Rat’s Ass Review, Nerve Lantern, Antinarrative, & HOOT. I have a chapbook of poems out from Dancing Girl Press & another chapbook forthcoming from Another New Calligraphy. I have poetry in Flim Forum Press’ anthology A Sing Economy and Nerve Lantern’s Yoko Ono: A Tribute to Yoko Ono, a collection of writing in response to Yoko Ono’s performance art. I’ve received grants from the Idaho Commission on the Arts and the Alexa Rose Foundation, and I am the 2017 Artist in Residence for Craters of the Moon National Monument. (I am also on Twitter and have a blog/website.)

Read Hannah’s Extinction Series: Poetry & CNF In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“London Zoo, 1864” — p. 42
“Triptych on a Passenger Pigeon Specimen Found in 1886 Chicago” — p. 43
“A Market Economy” — p. 46
“Epilogue | There Will Be a Test” — p. 47
“On Individual Stories & Extinction” — p. 48

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Howie Good — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Creativity is the goal as well as the means of a well-lived life.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I had an English teacher in 7th grade who expressed admiration for something I had written for homework. It was a rare instance of me receiving praise — at school or at home.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

[Blank]

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

Coffee is the fuel of the creative mind.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

By organizing my life around my writing rather than writing around the rest of my life.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Don’t be risk adverse. Rejection is part of the creative process. Use it to re-evaluate and, when necessary, revise your work.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

I hope my writing is making life more beautiful or more bearable or more meaningful for anyone who reads it.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Howie

Howie Good, a journalism professor at SUNY New Paltz, is the author of The Loser’s Guide to Street Fighting, winner of the 2017 Lorien Prize for Poetry from Thoughtcrime Press. He co-edits White Knuckle Press with Dale Wisely.

Read Howie’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Bright Stupid Confetti” — p. 53

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Joe Golc — Fiction Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

I think creativity is the greatest mean by which we authentically solve problems—something that should be appreciated rather than understood.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I started writing on a drunken dare from my buddies. During my senior year of college, a group of us were out and they all started breaking my balls about how I’m always telling stories. So they dared me to write one down—turn into a short story. So I did. They read it and seemed to dig it, so I wrote another. It wasn’t long before I started to feel like this is what I was meant to do.

As far as a muse goes, I don’t think there’s a “who” or “what” specifically. I try to take it all in, like a transparent eyeball. Because I never know what will spark an idea.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

So far, this—getting published.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

For me, writing is like solving a puzzle. And at the beginning of every puzzle, nothing is in place. Things are jumbled, pieces are missing, and life just sucks. That’s typically about the time creativity shows up and begins to slowly help me place the right words in the right order to eventually solve the puzzle. Then, as mysteriously as it arrived, it’s gone. Creativity is one of those things that’s inscrutable. It sort of just happens and I try not to question it for fear it may up and fly away—like grasping at an indifferent bird that drops by on your windowsill from time to time. I don’t know how or why or where it comes from, I simply try to stay nimble and fluid for when it shows up again. So I don’t write first thing in the morning or even standing up so my new pages fall gently in a waste basket—I do whatever it takes to get the job.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

Well, if it’s something you love to do, you just do it. I know that’s not the most eloquent answer but it’s the truth—you make time for things you care about. And there’s always time, you may just have to manage it more rigorously.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

I want to preface this by saying, beware of advice—even this. Starting out, I think it’s important to seek out advice and feedback from other creatives in your field but always with a grain of salt simply because you end up finding out a great many things on your own. We learn by doing and making mistakes. So do plenty and make plenty of mistakes, which is way easier said than done—find a way, any way, to make that process easier. And realize early, that this journey isn’t a climb—there is no submit—it’s a swim. So just keep swimming.

Because art is subjective, I tend to take a shotgun approach to submitting work, because you never know what may happen. 50 rejection letters with one acceptance is better than one rejection and no acceptance.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

Ultimately, I’d love to transition my writing talents into TV/Film—become a screenwriter.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Joe

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Joe Golc — Fiction Contributor
Despite his age and seemingly greenhorn status to prose, Joe Golc’s writing explores a more seasoned topic: the human condition and the role nature’s indifference plays on it. Which is why nailing down a genre of influence for him is difficult, as he has drawn upon everyone from Thompson to Nietzsche—anything brazen and out-of-the-norm, as he puts it. When he’s not rustling with the blank page, the 26-year-old writer from Indianapolis, Indiana works as a copywriter at a local advertising firm.

You Can Find Joe Here

Website

Read Joe’s Fiction In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“A Night in the Prism” — p. 60

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Jeremy Nathan Marks — Poetry Contributor, Pushcart Nominee

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Creativity is the way I want (and choose) to live in the world. By this I mean, I want to live and work in a way that allows me to utilize my imagination, emotions, conscience/consciousness and also my problem solving abilities. To me, the creative life is fundamentally the human life because it allows for improvisation, flexibility and for discovery, hallmarks of the human experience in history. I also feel that by living creatively, I have the opportunity to relate to my world in an authentic, humble and moral way because my heart and mind are allowed to work in unison. I see creativity, sustainability and meaningful work all intimately interwoven and I see how these are also immersed in friendship and the bonds of family and community.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

My muse has long been the natural world, music and, funny enough, politics. I started when I was very young but did not fully commit myself until I was in my thirties (long story). But I remember being positively floored by the music of Bob Dylan -his words especially- when I was 14. That clued me in to my need to be a poet and a writer.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

My most memorable experience is really a series of moments of intense inspiration when I feel that not only am I connecting to a place, a piece of music, a painting, a person, a memory or an idea; but these experiences are also the feeling itself and the experience of a recurring visit from the Muse. Part of the intensity is the feeling of obligation that these “visits” engender in me. I know well that sensation of having something that I need to say and feeling the duty to say it (this is what frequently brings about my poetry). These are moments I live for. (I should note, though, that I also will make myself write and not wait for inspiration and that works, too.)

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I take long walks; I listen to music; I meditate; I watch my daughter at play (and play with her); I bird watch; I observe animals generally; I pull books down from my shelves and open to ideas or questions that intrigue me. I don’t know that I have any superstitions, per se. I suppose my quirk is that if a piece of music inspires me, I will play it over and over again to maintain mood and to keep my thoughts moving. Sometimes this might involve a particular movement, riff or segment of a piece that can be as little as 10 seconds in length. I will repeat it dozen of times, if the spirit moves me.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

I learned that any time -5 minutes even- is valuable and so I try and seize any opportunity that I can. I also try and schedule time into my week to write. But writing does not mean that I have to sit for two or three hours and write (it took me time to realize this). If I have twenty minutes to write I try and take full advantage of that opportunity. I will use lunch breaks or if I am in the car waiting for my wife to come out of an appointment; I use those moments, too.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

I am sure that what I am about to say has been said often, but do not allow yourself to get discouraged or to think that your work does not matter. Rejections are an integral part of being a writer and just because something is rejected does not mean that it is not of quality. Rejections are not a referendum on the value of your chosen path as a writer. If you are persistent and are open-minded, these traits really do pay off. I would also say that it is best to share your work with those whom you trust. One story that has stayed with me is that of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, who said that he wrote his first novel knowing fully well that there was a distinct possibility that no one would ever read a word of it. He believe so strongly in the necessity of getting his words down and putting his truth on paper that he persevered. To me, this is the essence of committing oneself to the writing life and, more importantly, to committing oneself to life itself.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

In five years I would like to see my first novel published (while working on my second) along with my first poetry collection. I also would like to see writing playing a preponderant role in my working life.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Jeremy

Jeremy Nathan Marks is an American writer living in London, Ontario. His poetry has appeared or is appearing in places like Chiron Review, Muddy River, Lake, Up the Staircase Quarterly, The Hopper, Eunoia Review, The Wild Word, Nomadic, Jewish Literary Journal, Electric Windmill Press, Ariel Chart, The Blue Nib and I-70 Review. He has been nominated for the Best of the Net Award and is one of the winners of Poetry London’s 2015 Poetry Contest.

Read Jeremy’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Scenes From My Father’s Rhode Island” — p. 12
“North Providence Deli” — p. 16
“Ladies Auxiliary” — p. 57

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Michael Chin — Fiction Contributor, Pushcart Nominee

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

Creativity is largely rooted in individuality–seeing the world through your own unique lens and aiming to capture world as you see it.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I started writing as a child. While I draw inspiration from a lot of sources, memories from my youth, and particularly my hometown where I haven’t lived for about fifteen years have become a muse of sorts.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

I recall visiting a museum once and having the spark of a story cue up in my mind as I was watching street performers on the steps outside. I could barely focus on anything in the museum itself afterward, as I was so consumed with writing down all of my ideas before I forgot them.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I make every effort to write–or at least take down notes related to my writing–a little bit every day to keep the creative pipeline flowing. This often includes emailing myself notes during relatively mundane times like when I’m in line at a grocery store or while I’m brushing my teeth.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

I try to make use of every little scrap of time I can. It was a blessing in disguise that I started working pretty time consuming jobs right out of college, and could rarely take a whole hour or more to write. So, I got used to doing what I could with just a half hour, or fifteen minutes of time. Just a little work done repeatedly can add up quickly.

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

To me, both the hardest and most rewarding parts of a creative process are actually doing it, so I advise making creative endeavors you value a part of your routine as much as possible. As for submitting, I take a similar tack, especially when the rest of my life is busy, of trying to send things out on a regular basis. It’s daunting to try to get out ten submissions in a single sitting, but seeking out one or two venues to submit to and sending something to them, two or three times a week? Try skipping TV or getting up a half hour early a couple times a week, and you might be surprised at how reasonable that is to do.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

Years back, I got some of my best advice about writing, which was not try to compete with anyone else or plan too much, but rather to sing my own song the best I knew how. Five years from now, if I’m still doing that, then that’s all I can really ask for.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Michael

Michael Chin was born and raised in Utica, New York and his hybrid chapbook, The Leo Burke Finish, is available now from Gimmick Press. He won Bayou Magazine’s Jim Knudsen Editor’s Prize for fiction and has work published or forthcoming in journals including The Normal School, Passages North, and Hobart. He works as a contributing editor for Moss. Find him online at miketchin.com or follow him on Twitter @miketchin.

Read Michael’s Fiction In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Chords” — p. 93

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Mitchell Krockmalnik Grabois — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

A melding of the conscious and unconscious minds within a form, such as poetry

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I started writing at age 13, at about the time I became an atheist, though I don’t know if there was a connection. Other forms of creative expression, such as painting, serve as “muses.”

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

Spontaneously coming up with the ideas for my novel, “Two-Headed Dog”

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

Sit down in front of my laptop

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

I make it a priority

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

For writers, read a lot. Play with language. Express your self. Don’t become egotistical. In terms of submitting, use Duotrope. Approach the magazines with the highest acceptance rates first, then work your way down.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

I’m currently trying to get an agent for my novel, “The Rocky Road Messiah.”

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Mitchell

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Mitchell Krockmalnik Grabois — Poetry Contributor
Mitchell Krockmalnik Grabois has had over twelve-hundred of his poems and fictions appear in literary magazines in the U.S. and abroad. He has been nominated for numerous prizes. His novel, Two-Headed Dog, based on his work as a clinical psychologist in a state hospital, is available for Kindle and Nook, or as a print edition. To see more of his work, google Mitchell Krockmalnik Grabois. He lives in Denver.

Read Mitchell’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Valium” — p. 26

TWD Magazine 3rd Collection Interview: Joseph M. Felser — Poetry Contributor

The Wire's Dream Magazine Logo
As an extension of The Black Lion Journal’s mission, The Wire’s Dream is a semi-annual magazine that values community, life perspectives, and different worldviews. Contributors were asked to complete a set of mini interview questions with the purpose of sharing with the readers and their fellow submitters a bit about who they are and about their creativity. All questions were the same for each contributor; and each answer given is unique, open, friendly, and candid.

About Creativity

Let’s start by talking about creativity — what does creativity mean to you?

For me creativity is a certain state of consciousness; a kind of receptive mode in which I am able to just step aside and let it happen. It’s more of an “allowing” than a “making.” I think this is true whether I am teaching in the classroom, or writing (philosophy or poetry). There’s a certain spontaneity and vibrancy to it.

How and when did you get started doing what you love to do? Who or what is your creative muse?

I’m very fortunate because I’ve been doing what I love to do ever since I was in college (a very long time ago now!), which is to explore the realm of ideas and the inner world of dreams and visions. Actually, I’ve been doing that informally since childhood! So you could say I’ve always done what I love to do. I only recently started to write poetry in a disciplined way, but I would say that’s only an extension of my earlier explorations. It’s just a different part of the territory that I’m exploring now.

What is your most memorable creative experience, if any?

Some of the poems I’ve written have come sort of like instant downloads: all of a sudden they’re just there, and I pretty much just write them down. Maybe change a word or a phrasing here or there, but that’s pretty much it.

People approach creativity in such different ways! What about you? What is your creative routine? Do you know of any quirky habits or creative superstitions?

I walk a few miles in the park every day, and a lot of things come to me on those walks. Being outdoors, in nature, and moving my body seems to be a way to open to the creative.

Time, Tips, & Future Goals

How do you make time to do what you love to do?

If I’m too preoccupied with outer events, and I don’t make time to go inside myself, I suffer. I’m miserable. So I know I have to do it. Fish gotta swim!

What tips can you give novice creatives about getting started on their creative journey and about submitting their work for publication?

Get your ego out of the way and just let things happen. It’s there and it wants to come through; trust it. As far as submitting goes, my attitude is that the work will find its proper audience, even if that is only me. I don’t mind rejections at all. They give me an opportunity to reassess the work. Sometimes I do revise things, and it makes them better pieces.

What do you hope to achieve with your creativity? Where would you like to see yourself in about 5 years, professionally and creatively?

I will continue to write and teach (philosophy), as this is what I enjoy doing.

— TWD Magazine 3rd Collection—

About Joseph

Joseph M. Felser, Ph.D. received his doctorate in philosophy from The University of Chicago. He is is on the faculty at Kingsborough Community College/CUNY in Brooklyn, New York, where he has taught since 1997. The author of numerous published articles and reviews, as well as two books, The Way Back to Paradise (2004) and The Myth of the Great Ending (2011), he also serves as a member of the Board of Directors of The Monroe Institute in Faber, Virginia. He recently began writing poetry, which has appeared in both print and online journals, including Whatever Our Souls, Wildflower Muse, Ordinary Madness, Joey and the Black Boots ReBoot, Red Wolf Journal, and The Mystic Blue Review.

Read Joseph’s Poetry In TWD Magazine 3rd Collection

“Silent Night” — p. 22
“Twisted” — p. 27
“404 Not Found” — p. 59
“Werewolves Of Brooklyn” — p. 86
“I Let You In” — p. 88